What it Really Means to be Made in the USA

April 3rd, 2013 | Category: Featured Content

You often hear companies touting their products as “Made in America.” Recently, Window Film magazine looked at the Federal Trade Commission’s “Made in USA” Act which was designed to give the agency “the power to bring law enforcement actions against false or misleading claims that a product is of U.S. origin.” Other programs are in place as well to help consumers make informed decisions and this includes Made in USA Certified®.

The designation is the only registered “Made in USA Certified” Word Mark with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, according to the organization.

“When we say it’s ‘Made in USA,’ you can count on it,” says Julie Reiser, co-founder of Made in USA Certified and director of marketing for the Manufacturing Leadership Network, a division of Frost & Sullivan.

Any company bearing one of the USA-C seals has gone through a rigorous supply chain audit to ensure that the product and processes originate in the United States of America.

The designation is an independent certification system that applies proprietary audit criteria consistently across companies, and criteria are checked through the company’s supply chain. “The seal says the company has committed to American jobs and to the American economy,” says Reiser. “Displaying the seal gives consumers the option to visibly support products and services of the USA.”

So why should companies look at this program?

“The biggest thing I try to do is educate people that the claim of ‘Made in the USA’ is unregulated. There are so many companies just making that claim,” says Reiser. “The only way the consumer really knows is if the company does a supply chain audit.”

It’s completely different to say it than to prove it, she adds.

“It says a lot about a company’s willingness to remain transparent. For companies it’s a powerful branding tool to distinguish among those who may be making false claims,” says Reiser.

She also adds that purchasing dollars are going to support a U.S. manufacturer and create U.S. jobs “which is at the crux of our problems now.”

“One of the things this does for companies is it distinguishes them against those in their industry who may be making a false claim to gain market share,” she says. “If the company has legitimately gone through the process and awarded the seal that puts them head and shoulders above the competition.”

For more on being “Made in the USA” check out the May/June digital edition of Window Film magazine.

Tags: , , , ,

2 comments
Leave a comment »

  1. Very interesting subject. Leon Levy Klingshield South Africa

  2. This is great news for manufacturers that stand behind their products with no moral compromise.
    The only thing the article doesn’t explain is how manufacturers become certified.

    Good stuff!

Leave Comment