Senate Considers Legislation to Give Rebates to Homeowners for Energy-Savings

July 30th, 2010 | Category: Featured Content

In May the House of Representatives passed legislation that would give rebates to homeowners who install energy-saving products, which includes window film, and now the Senate is considering the same Home Star legislation.

In order for homeowners to qualify for the rebates they must have window film installed

on at least eight exterior doors, windows or skylights, or 75 percent of the total exterior square footage of glass in a home, whichever is more. The films must be certified by the National Fenestration Rating Council and have a solar heat gain coefficient of 0.43 or less with a visible light-to-solar heat gain coefficient of at least 1.1 for installations in 2009 International Energy Conservation Code climate zones 1-3; or a solar heat gain coefficient of 0.43 or less with a visible light light-to-solar heat gain coefficient of at least 1.1 and a U-factor of 0.40 or less as installed in 2009 International Energy Conservation Code climate zones 4-8.

Homeowners can receive $1,000 per measure and the maximum rebate for a home is $3,000 or 50 percent of the total cost of the installed measures.

If this bill passes in the Senate it will likely go to a congressional conference committee work out the differences between the House and Senate versions for joint agreement.

The International Window Film Association (IWFA) was heavily involved in getting window film included in the bill. IWFA president John Parker and executive director Darrell Smith responded to the Senate’s plans to discuss the legislation. “As the U.S. House of Representatives has already recognized the benefits of window film and passed Home Star legislation (H.R. 5019), it is more important than ever for the Senate to embrace measures that allow homeowners to receive rebates for the installation of high performance window film products.”

The statement continues, “The window film industry stands ready to work with Congress to continue to advance common sense, responsible policies that recognize highly efficient window film as a critical and effective energy savings measure.”

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